Queensberry Seal Matrix

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

seal seal 

 



THE JAMES DOUGLAS, 2ND DUKE OF QUEENSBERRY (1672-1711) SEAL MATRIX
AN IMPORTANT EARLY 18TH CENTURY SCOTTISH SILVER SEAL MATRIX, CIRCA 1701
Sold at auction for £4,788 in May 2023


Description
The large dished circular matrix with deeply carved and engraved armorial, the reverse, engraved with mirrored monogram JQ, with ducal coronet above

Dimensions
Diameter 10.3cm, weight: 13.2oz


Heraldry:

Arms: Quarterly 1st and 4th Argent a man’s heart gules ensigned with an imperial crown proper on a chief azure three mullets of the field (for Douglas) 2nd and 3rd Azure a bend between six cross crosslets fitchy or (or Mar) the whole within a bordure or charged with the double tressure of Scotland gules the arms are environed by the Garter and ensigned with a duke’s coronet.
Crest: A heart gules winged and ensigned with an imperial crown or (for Douglas)
Supporters: Two pegasi argent winged or
Motto: Forward

Note:

James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry and 1st Duke of Dover was a highly important politician in 18th-century Scotland. The eldest son of William Douglas, 1st Duke of Queensberry and his wife Isabel Douglas. Educated at Glasgow University he was awarded title of Privy Councillor by the age of 22 in 1684.

He served in various regiments including Dundee’s Regiment of Horse and was appointed Colonel of the Scots Troop of the Horse Guard Regiment. A supporter of William III, it was under his reign he was commissioned as a Colonel, presumably for his support in the 1688 Glorious Revolution.

His political career was hugely successful and on the death of his father and his elevation to 2nd Duke of Queensberry, the titles and roles he held in the highest office would grow. He held positions such as Lord High Treasurer of Scotland (1693), Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland (1695 – 1702), and Extraordinary Lord of Session, Lord High Commissioner to the Scottish Parliament (1701-1703). His position close to the Royal Household was made even clearer in 1701 when he was appointed Knight of the Garter.

Although obviously a Royalist and in 1707 would be instrumental in securing the Act of Union, he did become embroiled, and some would say supported the Jacobite cause. He was tricked by Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat into trying to betray the Duke of Atholl to the Royal Court for his Jacobite support. This ultimately poor attempt and failed scheme meant Douglas stepped back from Government in 1704.

His fall from favour was short as the following year he was reinstated as Keeper of the Privy Seal among other roles. As mentioned, he ultimately helped secure the Act of Union which lost him many friends, but did mean he received a £3000 per year pension.

His rewards were not just monetary as he was given English titles to match his Scottish ones already held and was created Duke of Dover, Marquess of Beverley and Earl of Rippon in 1708.

His career and indeed life would not last long after this and while serving as Secretary of State for Scotland, from 1709, he died in office in 1711.

He was succeeded by his second son Charles as his eldest, some considered ‘insane'; consequently passing over from succeeding his premier titles but was given the titular title of Marquess, befitting the son of a Duke.


Source

 

Sources for this article include:
•  Lyon & Turnbull, auctioneers
•  Matrix: A Collection of British Seals - David Morris 2012- - Seal 23, page 64

Any contributions will be gratefully accepted






 

Back to top

 



The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

Contact Us

Last modified: Friday, 17 May 2024